Posts Tagged: Roxane Gay

Dasgupta feature

Goddesses

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I closed my laptop. I thought of words such as “contexts” and “perspectives.” The next morning, I checked out an armload of books from the university library. I had to learn to defend Durga. ...more

Freeman, John photo credit Deborah Treisman

The Big Idea #12: John Freeman

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John Freeman, Executive Editor at Lit Hub, talks with Suzanne Koven about his new print-only literary magazine Freeman's, the difference between between criticism and editing, and his fear of flying. ...more

Angela Flournoy

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Angela Flournoy

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My ambition is personal. I don’t think I need to succeed so that the race can succeed. ...more

The Work That Remains to Be Done

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“I keep trying to imagine a universe in which too many public figures declaring themselves feminists would be a bad thing,” Roxane Gay, the novelist and the author of an essay collection entitled “Bad Feminist,” wrote, before concluding, “Of all the words that should be spoken more, ‘feminist’ should be at the top of the list.”

For the New Yorker, Rebecca Mead traces the history of Kate Millet’s Sexual Politics, pop culture feminism, and the work that still needs to be done.

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Guildtalk #4: The Rumpus Interview with Saeed Jones

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Saeed Jones talks about his forthcoming memoir How Men Fight For Their Lives, his new fellowship program at BuzzFeed, and making peace with the phantom. ...more

Alida Nugent_credit Virginia Ahern (1)

The Rumpus Interview with Alida Nugent

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Alida Nugent talks about her new book You Don’t Have to Like Me: Essays on Growing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding Feminism, the messiness and realness of sex and sexuality, and putting likeability last. ...more

New Year, New Reading List

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When Esquire released a list of “The 80 Best Books Every Man Should Read,” the magazine provoked ire and excoriation. But hey, at least Esquire has recognized its mistake. For its new list of “80 Books Every Person Should Read,” the magazine consulted women readers who know what they’re talking about, from authors like Lauren Groff and Sloane Crosley to book critics like Camille Perri and Michiko Kakutani to one of the baddest feminists out there, Roxane Gay.

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The Rumpus Interview with Elisa Gabbert

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Author Elisa Gabbert talks about her books, The Self Unstable and The French Exit, diversity, publishing, whiteness, and writing in the Internet Age. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Laurie Foos

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Laurie Foos discusses her latest novel, The Blue Girl, feminism, Michael Jackson, and mythical moon pies. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jennifer Baker

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The more variation we see in life, the more it becomes less about seeing one type of book by marginalized people. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Suffragette and Feminist Inaction

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A significant issue in the suffragette movement was its racist treatment of women of color. ...more

Taking Students Seriously

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Roxane Gay, over at The New Republic, on student activism:

In the protests at Mizzou and Yale and elsewhere, students have made it clear that the status quo is unbearable. Whether we agree with these student protesters or not, we should be listening: They are articulating a vision for a better future, one that cannot be reached with complacency.

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Roxane Gay Wins PEN Center Award

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Literary juggernaut, Rumpus Essays Editor Emeritus, and beloved Twitter person Roxane Gay won the PEN Center USA Freedom to Write Award. Gay told Lit Hub:

“The freedom to write,” Gay said about winning the award, “has been one of my life’s greatest blessings and it is a freedom that should be available to everyone who wants or needs to share their voice,” says Gay.

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“Happily Ever After” for African-American Romance Novelists

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Romance novels can’t erase the past, and the present. Chapter by chapter, they do strive toward agency. ...more

Roxane Gay on Forgiveness

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In a powerful New York Times op-ed, Roxane Gay explains why she does not forgive the Charleston shooter:

Over the weekend, newspapers across the country shared headlines of forgiveness from the families of the nine slain. The dominant media narrative vigorously embraced that notion of forgiveness, seeming to believe that if we forgive we have somehow found a way to make sense of the incomprehensible.

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Roxane Gay on NYT’s Alabaster Summer Reading List

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“Another day, another all-white list of recommended reading.”

So begins a piece on NPR from Roxane Gay on the New York Timess newly released summer reading list, which features zero authors of color. Gay argues that national outlets with wide-ranging audiences, like NYT or NPR, should not and cannot afford to continue leaving out extraordinary works by a diversity of authors.

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Five Things About Ashley Ford

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Blogger and writer Ashley Ford is profiled at the Indianapolis Star. She talks about her childhood in Indiana, writing a memoir, and more:

We’re never going to see eye-to-eye on what’s OK to write about. I’m not trying to embarrass or hurt anybody but telling my story is something I can’t compromise.

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Empty Comment Balloon feature

No Comment

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An hour later. Still empty. This bothers me. I am embarrassed that it bothers me. But not embarrassed enough that it stops me from checking again. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction: A Guide to AWP

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It’s that time of year again, where writers young and old, from all corners of the country, come to congregate in one gigantic, frenetic, neurotic, alcohol-infused crowd, in a couple of fancy hotels no one can really afford, to stay in and talk shop (or not, depending on how your writing’s been this year).

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Like Whatever

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Art is problematic. Humans are problematic. Roxane Gay is a bad feminist. We know this, yet still we attack each other for liking Lil Wayne or Fifty Shades of Grey. Flavorwire‘s Sarah Seltzer wants us to stop telling women what they can and can’t like:

I wouldn’t abandon the practice of critiquing art for its political stance…But what I won’t say is: you’re a bad feminist if you like [Philip] Roth.

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