Posts Tagged: Women’s History

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #96: Donna Baier Stein

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Colorado’s Baby Doe Tabor was a bad ass. Born in 1854, ‘Lizzie,’ as she was known, bucked social norms of her day. In an era when silver miners believed it bad luck to even speak to a woman before descending into the mines, Lizzie worked alongside her male counterparts in the damp, dark underground caverns.

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On Ladies’ Creative Pursuits

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There are certain stereotypes about women’s creativity prior to the twentieth century, and generally they revolve around appropriately domestic novels, amateur watercolors, needlework, and “folk art.” But there’ve always been women who found ways around those rules.

For Pictorial at Jezebel, Kelly Faircloth writes on an exhibit at the New York Public Library featuring the work of female printmakers from the 16th through the 19th centuries.

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Fresh Comics #3: Remarkable Histories

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One of the goals of the Fresh Comics series is to shine some light on superb works of comic storytelling. Another is to look a little deeper into the content of these superb comics and to ask “fresh” questions about them.

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The Rumpus Interview with LaShonda Katrice Barnett

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Novelist LaShonda Katrice Barnett discusses her debut novel, Jam on the Vine, how becoming a historian taught her about plot, Muslims living in Texas in the 19th century, and the Missouri State Penitentiary, also known as “the bloodiest 47 acres in America.” ...more