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Posts by: Rebecca Rubenstein

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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It wasn’t a very essay-heavy weekend here at The Rumpus, but we still published all kinds of good stuff. Check it out: Amy Cheney, who has worked as a librarian in a detention center for the past 12 years, recommends three must-reads for those “who live on or are interested in the margins and the […]

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The Iliad, Improved

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Rumpus head illustrator Jason Novak has another cool panorama over at The Paris Review. Titled “The Iliad, Improved,” Novak puts his own spin on the Greek epic: “I’d originally intended to treat the story without embellishment but just couldn’t allow poor Ajax to fall on his own sword at the end. Homer’s world is populated with people driven […]

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Take Their Advice

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“Initially, I thought who am I to tell people what to do? Then I realized I wasn’t telling people what to do from the perspective that this is the only opinion and my opinion is the one that matters. I try to write with a sense of awareness and humility. A lot of times my […]

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Like Music for A Writer’s Ears

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A little over a month ago, our friends at Litquake debuted their newest venture: a podcast. Available as a free, bi-monthly download, Litquake’s Lit Cast features the “best of” in writerly conversations and readings that Litquake holds throughout the year, and has already showcased the talents of Adam Johnson, Geoff Dyer, Peter Carey, Carolyn Burke, and […]

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The Secret World of Punctuation

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“Em-dash is complicated, and she’s not about to let you forget it. It takes three keys to create her, after all. She lives on the blood of baby hyphens, and one time, in a bar, while very drunk, she stole En-Dash’s purse and took it home with her. When En-Dash called the next day  to […]

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The Agony of Undefeat

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Our friends at WRITE CLUB SF are hosting their awesome monthly event tonight, so go if you have the chance! “The Agony of Undefeat (Special XL Edition!)” will feature 8 WRITE CLUB SF champions duking it out, with only 4 left undefeated. There will be: 4 rounds of 2 writers with 2 opposing ideas for 7 minutes […]

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Weekend Essay Roundup

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Though August is the laxest month (even Congress goes on vacation!), The Rumpus continues to fill its weekends with top-notch essays. Here’s what went up over the last three days: Amy Butcher argues in favor of Eminem’s artistry, despite his lyrics being in direct opposition of everything she stands for socially. Michelle Dean reveals that […]

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In The Year 2311…

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Writer Ben Greenman and artist Jaya Miceli have a fun op-art piece up at The New York Times. Titled “On This Date in Future History,” Greenman and Miceli predict some events to come, including the fate of the NFL, the rise of a religion called Xama, and James Cameron’s multitude of successes in the sciences. For […]

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The Rumpus Loves New York!

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Attention NYC folks: we’ve got another event coming up, and this one’s for you! On Monday, September 10th, The Rumpus Loves New York! will be taking over Public Assembly. We’ll be co-hosting this amazing night with Flavorpill, and featuring readings by some of our favorite people: Sam Lipsyte, Nick Flynn, Amber Tamblyn, Andrew McCarthy, and […]

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SF Comedy and Burrito Festival

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Do you like comedy? And burritos? Or maybe you like comedy while eating burritos? The SF Comedy and Burrito Festival is coming this October, and tickets are on sale now. Featuring Rumpus contributor and all-around funny woman Janine Brito, as well as over 100 comics from around the country, the weekend-long festival will take place […]

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Our House

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For those of us living in San Francisco (or any urban center, for that matter), Peter Orner’s “Who Owns That House?” will probably hit some familiar notes. Published today on The New York Times’s Opinionator blog, the Rumpus columnist’s piece tells the all-too-common story of one family’s struggle to contend with the reality of being “priced out” of […]

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The Love Songs for Lamps Roadshow

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Brace yourselves: The Believer‘s totally rad rock show, The Love Songs for Lamps Roadshow, is coming to San Francisco this Sunday! In conjunction with its 2012 Music Issue—which you can buy here and read excerpts from here—The Believer has spent all of August touring a handful of rock stars around the country so they can get their bass on […]

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“Pier 70: In Its Own Words”

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If you’re in San Francisco and at a loss for something to do tonight—or want to revise your plans and do something much cooler—head over to Dogpatch Wineworks for the opening of “Pier 70: In Its Own Words.” A collaboration between Rumpus contributor, local artist, and community champion Wendy MacNaughton and Forest City (the minds […]

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End of An Era

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We’re all a bit sad to be losing Adobe Bookshop here in San Francisco. Due to high rent, the 24-year-old haven for bibliophiles will be shutting its doors at the end of the month. Today, The Bold Italic pays tribute to Adobe, as well as other indie bookstores beloved by SF and Bay Area residents. […]

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Everything is Fiction

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“When you tell yourself the story of your life, the story of your day, you edit and rewrite and weave a narrative out of a collection of random experiences and events. Your conversations are fiction. Your friends and loved ones—they are characters you have created. And your arguments with them are like meetings with an […]

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Drawing On the Truth

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“It’s a tricky business, legitimacy. Often, as we dole it out, our decisions are informed by invisible forces that are anything but objective. Who sets the standards? What happens when we label someone else’s story as invalid? And how could the benefits possibly outweigh the risks?” The above is from Kim O’Connor’s extensive piece, “Penis […]

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Round One

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On the heels of our interview with William Shatner, here’s another icon for the taking. At The Nervous Breakdown, Rumpus contributor Brin-Johnson Butler interviews Mike Tyson. Mixing memoir and journalism, Butler unpacks a lifelong closeness he’s felt to the boxing champion: At a certain point Mike Tyson and I reacted to violence a little differently. […]

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Not So Progressive

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If you’ve never had to deal with the inadequacies of an insurance company, consider yourself lucky.  Gawker reports on a terrible instance of auto insurance failure, in which Progressive not only refused to honor a car accident victim’s policy, but sent its legal team to represent the driver of the other vehicle. The news broke after […]

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The Blue Velvet Project

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This Friday, Filmmaker will conclude “The Blue Velvet Project,” a year-long endeavor helmed by Rumpus columnist Nicholas Rombes. Published three times a week, the project is an ambitious feat: for every 47 seconds of film, Rombes analyzes a frame from David Lynch’s neo-noir classic, and delves into the psychological, cultural, and historical implications present in Lynch’s oft-surreal cinematic landscape. Though […]

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Pen & Ink Love

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Storyboard has an awesome interview up featuring the masterminds behind Pen & Ink: Rumpus managing editor Isaac Fitzgerald and SF-based artist and frequent Rumpus contributor Wendy MacNaughton. In case you’re unfamiliar, Pen & Ink is a mixed-media project that combines the personal stories behind tattoos with MacNaughton’s beautiful hand-drawn work. Click here to learn more.

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In The Not-So-Penal Colony

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Today at The Morning News, Alexander Chee waxes poetic about artist colonies. Touching on MacDowell, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Civitella Ranieri, Chee explores the mystery behind the everyday at colonies, and dispels the myth that these places are primarily homes to artist-fueled debauchery. From “Go Away”: After an arts colony stay, the […]

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Weekend Essay Round-Up

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This weekend’s Rumpus was a little quieter than usual, but by no means silent. If you missed them, here are three essays to get your week going: Michelle Dean pays tribute to David Rakoff. She also sheds light on an affair between the philandering H.G. Wells and one of his mistresses, the headstrong critic Rebecca […]

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Put Some Money in the Jukebox

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Today Brain Pickings launches its music-meets-literature venture, Literary Jukebox. Dubbed “an experiment in cross-pollinating the arts,” Literary Jukebox is a daily project whereby editor Maria Popova handpicks a sentence from a favored work of literature, then selects a piece of music that complements the sentence’s tone. From Popova’s introduction: “As a lover of both literature and music, I frequently find […]

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Your Guide to the Literary on Tumblr

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Well this is awesome: The Millions just published the mother of all literary blog round-ups. Still comprised of Tumblrs, Nick Moran expands on a round-up he did six months ago, shortly after The Millions joined the Tumblr community. Arguably more comprehensive, Moran’s current compilation now features authors, poets, bookstores, libraries, previously unmentioned Big Six and indie publishers, a different […]

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Transcontinental Summer Reading

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It’s no secret that The Rumpus is 100% behind kids taking an active interest in books. Which is why we’re excited by this ongoing summer series, “Transcontinental Summer Reading,” curated by The Morning News. The concept behind the series is simple: editor Bridget Fitzgerald interviews kids of different ages and international backgrounds about what they’ve been reading […]

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Throwing Stones at the Moon

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Earlier this week, McSweeney’s published an excerpt from the next installment in its Voice of Witness book series. In case you’re unfamiliar, Voice of Witness—which also functions as a nonprofit—produces works that call attention to social injustices carried out on international and domestic scales. Through collected oral histories, the books empower their subjects by exploring […]

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Weekend Essay Round-Up

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We published so much good content this weekend, we hope you didn’t miss it. But just in case: Amber Sparks considers how religion can fuel one’s writing—even when the writer is secular. Thomas Page McBee gives us another “Self-Made Man,” further exploring what it means to be “a man born of medicine.” Michelle Dean argues for […]

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Peripherally Olympic

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Full of history and intrigue, here’s some suggested peripheral reading to accompany the beloved games: Over at The New Inquiry, native Londoner Laurie Penny agrees to ride the Underground for a full day, then writes about the forgotten history, ghost architecture, police brutality, and socioeconomic warfare that haunt the city’s Tube lines amidst newfound Olympic prestige. […]

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Weekend Essay Roundup

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Just in case you were too busy watching the first rounds of the Olympic games this weekend (and we don’t blame you—that shit is awesome), here are some Rumpus highlights you might have missed: Anne Elizabeth Moore observes history and class transformed by communal dance on the Cambodian waterfront. Caleb Powell and Tim Jones-Yelvington exchange some […]

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