Quantcast

Posts Tagged: n+1

Sacred and Profane and Infinitely Compassionate: Remembering Anthony Veasna So

By

Agent Rob McQuilkin and editor Helen Atsma discuss AFTERPARTIES by Anthony Veasna So.

...more

This Week in Essays

By

Alexandra Wuest tackles grief, art, and the insights solitude can offer over at Fanzine. For Real Life, Eleanor Penny asks the big questions about and considers the implications of the creation of an artificial womb. Here at The Rumpus, Zoe Fisher recalls finding a radical sanctuary in her local library as a teenager.

...more

Deplorable Men Need Love Too

By

She went on to become a Siberian housewife. He went on to call for the executions of ten million Russians. But she thought back on their evenings drinking and dancing. He sang songs to her in his sweet, high voice. Behind every dictator is a woman who sees something redeemable in him. For n+1, Shawn Wen […]

...more

The Generosity of Anonymity

By

At n+1, Dayna Tortorici defends Elena Ferrante’s anonymity against yet another round of exposure, calling the unmaskers out for insensitivity and greed. Tortorici believes it’s all too easy to be distracted from the integrity of the book by the author’s bio and personality. She writes, “Ferrante’s absence keeps things open: ‘Remove that individual [the author] […]

...more

“A Return to the Pleasures of Critical Discourse”

By

“Greif turns the quotidian world over like a miniature globe in his hand, scrutinizing it for false messages, bad faith, and the occasional sign of progress,” writes Daphne Merkin, in The New York Times, of n+1 co-founder Mark Greif’s essay collection, Against Everything. On subjects as diverse Thoreau, exercise, “foodieism,” and the Octomom, Greif’s eye is […]

...more

“A Hologram of Self”

By

Kristin Dombek’s The Selfishness of Others: An Essay on the Fear of Narcissism is just out from FSG, and over at n+1 she writes beguilingly, with humor and aplomb, about narcissists as hollow selves who become genius-tricksters at copying and adopting the brightest parts of the selves of others. Beware! They take what they think […]

...more

The Things Abandoned by Hollywood

By

Thinking about his films while watching an American film leads to a sobering realization: all the things that Kiarostami could not show in his films became the only things Hollywood filmmakers chose to show in theirs. What he showed in his films were the things abandoned by Hollywood: conversation, friendship, understanding, compassion, and empathy. There’s […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

In a darkly humorous new story at n+1, Jen George questions the qualifications of being “adult,” gives thirty-somethings across the world nightmares, and packs in plenty of social criticism while she’s at it. The story, “Guidance/The Party,” follows a single, childless, career-less, 33-year-old woman who is visited by a mysterious Guide. The Guide has been […]

...more

Remembering Jenny Diski

By

At n+1, philosopher and writer Justin E.H. Smith remembers Jenny Diski, and shares their correspondence. For Diski, death was always the subject, the knot to admire, wryly, and attempt to untie: …the year before her diagnosis, Jenny invokes the bleak wisdom of Beckett’s line, “Birth was the death of him.” She wonders with Nabokov why […]

...more

Conversations with Writers Braver than Me: Anne Roiphe

By

Anne Roiphe on respecting writers’ freedom to express the truth of their experiences, while also respecting their subjects’ prerogative to shun them for it.

...more