Posts Tagged: The Smart Set

This Week in Essays

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For The Smart Set, Natasha Burge walks the streets of Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and examines the ways both cities and selves can change through time. In this latest Multitudes installment for The Rumpus, Christine No writes a stunning piece on family and attempts at healing.

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This Week in Essays

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For Lidia Yuknavitch, the personal is unavoidably political in this piece for Electric Literature. At Catapult, David Frey writes with moving realness on what it is like to watch a parent age and transition into assisted living. Jenessa Abrams looks at the nuances of mental illness and the damage of a word like “crazy” here at The Rumpus.

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On Our Public Privacy

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In this Smart Set piece, Stefany Anne Golberg contemplates the “public commodification of privacy,” finding a precursor to our own tendencies in the poet Charles Baudelaire’s navigation of 19th century urban life. “But the illusion of public privacy is one we have all created, one we all participate in — and understandably so. Like Baudelaire, […]

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Obscured Greatness

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Bookslut zeroes in on the seemingly perpetual obscurity of women’s work in the arts. Looking at artists like Lee Krasner, Leonor Fini, and Mina Loy,—the spaces and roles that they were pushed into, along with the often intangible forms of sexism confronted—the piece wonders how to “restore women to the historical record without getting out […]

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Travel Fail?

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You know that pervasive storyline that says that travel will transform you, change your life, and help you find yourself? What if that does not happen; have you “failed” at travel? This essay considers that question, and takes notice of that pressure on travel writers to “create a personal arc of transformation,” pointing out that […]

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What’s the Catch?

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Catch-22 turns 50 today. What better way to celebrate than perusing this article. It discusses why the novel has inspired such “divergent” reactions. In teasing out the reasons, the article takes us back into the intricacies of Heller’s work and argues that the principal flaw comes from a clash between the novel’s satirical intention and […]

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