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Posts by: Julie Morse

O, Miami!

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If you’re in Miami this April, please come check out O, Miami! It’s a wonderful, month-long poetry festival featuring translation and editing workshops, open mics, yoga, poetry karaoke, a youth poetry slam, and readings from poets like Jimmy Santiago Baca, Elena Medel, and Jaswinder Bolina.

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“Baby Steps, Baby Steps”

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Following up on the Reddit Ask Me Anything conversation with Bill Murray, Nathan Rabin at The Dissolve has written a comical and respectable introspective on the tenure of the actor’s career.

Murray lent his presence to a different kind of sports comedy in Space Jam playing a family-friendly version of himself opposite the vast, comedy-killing black hole that is Michael Jordan.

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Survival of The Adjuncts

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We’ve talked about the struggling plight of adjunct teachers in the past, but The New York Times has put out a pained portrait of James D. Hoff, an adjunct English teacher in the CUNY conglomerate and it’s worth a look.  Hoff’s story is one of many seeing that over sixty-percent of CUNY’s instructors are part-time adjunct.

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Retrospective: Nancy vs. Tonya

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This month in The Believer, Sarah Marshall takes a look back at figure skating in the 90’s. Particularly the stifled rivalry between US ice princesses Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan. Marshall’s perspective is not unique but it’s beautifully thorough. She examines the figure skating business like a true heart-broken fan – yearning for Kerrigan’s lost reparations yet also grieving a sport that has thrown away its potential to empower its skaters both socially and politically.

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De origine actibusque aequationis

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So: a train races beneath the city, having been made into a vehicle of war, covered with signatures and symbols, it goes crosstown, downtown, taking with it the story of dystopia and crack cocaine, “armamentation,” and innovation as it travels. This is what myths do: they tell us how things came to be.

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Real Thanksgiving Stories for Young Readers

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Are you a teacher or parent looking for realistic thanksgiving literature? No, not the books about Native Americans and pilgrims carving a turkey together but children books that tell the real story? Check out Indian Country’s list of young adult and children’s books that dispel the tall tale of Thanksgiving and give the low down on what Native people actually went through.

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“What if poetry isn’t enough?” – Ntozake Shange

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Ntozake Shange, the poet, author and playwright who is mostly known for her play “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf,” is at it again with, “Lost in Language and Sound: Or How I Found My Way to the Arts,” which had its first reading at Nuyorican Poets Café a couple weeks ago.

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Searching for Dave Chappelle

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“To turn his back on Hollywood, to walk away from the spotlight because it was turning him into a man he didn’t want to be—a man without dignity—was a move that was, in a way, Chappelle’s birthright, his own unwieldy kind of Negritude.”

Featured in this month’s Believer is Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah’s essay on the 10-year anniversary of Dave Chappelle’s departure from his self-titled show.

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Memorializing the Card Catalog

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Sometimes it’s hard for a librarian to admit that we’ve arrived at the age of the virtual card catalog system. It’s a sentiment that’s especially true for Greenfield Community College librarian Hope Schneider who spent fourteen years sending out retired catalog cards to their respective authors asking for a signature or a short tribute.

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The Plight of African Journalism

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“If you say something happens in a place like Marikana [South Africa], for us to send a team of journalists to cover it directly it would be too expensive. I do think it’s a problem. When foreigners come here they may paint somehow a different picture from the way Africans can see things happening.”

African journalism needs a light at the end of the tunnel, that’s for certain.

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McSweeney’s How Music Works Contest!

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After much anticipation, David Byrne’s How Music Works is finally hot off the presses in PAPERBACK! Our friends and publishers at McSweeney’s have proposed a contest for fans and readers alike, tweet or Instagram a photo of the book’s poster in its natural habitat of New York City with the hashtag #howmusicworkspb and be automatically entered to win a copy of the book for free!

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Brooklyn Public Library’s Hurricane Sandy Oral History Project

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The Brooklyn Public Library is inviting all Brooklyn residents to participate in its Hurricane Sandy Oral History Project. News articles and statistics don’t equate to personal narratives recounting the emotional impact of the storm.

Participants will be interviewed for 20-30 minutes and their stories will be preserved in a permanent collection and many will be available online.

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