Posts by: Julie Morse

The Rumpus Weekly Review of Books

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A short story collection 15 years in the making, a “slacker intellectual” aboard an aircraft carrier, and poems about everyday political frictions—it’s all in our books coverage this week.

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Poets.org Gets a Makeover

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The Academy of American Poets is celebrating its 80th year and the end of National Poetry Month by relaunching Poets.org, one of the world’s largest databases for poems, information on poets, and lesson plans for k-12 educators. The revamped site has expanded to include nationwide resources for news on poetry events and literary organizations, articles […]

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O, Miami!

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If you’re in Miami this April, please come check out O, Miami! It’s a wonderful, month-long poetry festival featuring translation and editing workshops, open mics, yoga, poetry karaoke, a youth poetry slam, and readings from poets like Jimmy Santiago Baca, Elena Medel, and Jaswinder Bolina. There’s an event taking place every day for the entire […]

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Book of Wikipedia

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Some Wikipedia fans in Germany are aiming to change the way the online, editable encyclopedia is read. The group known as PediaPress is trying to raise $50,000 to turn the website into a 1,000 volume set of books, each containing around 1,200 pages. Their goal is to exhibit the printed encyclopedia at a Wikimania conference […]

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Amazon.com vs. The Universe?

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In The New Yorker this week, George Packer covers what sounds like a battle between serf states but is actually the heated war between Amazon, Apple and the Big 6 publishers. He gives us the low-down on Amazon’s tumultuous foray into online publishing and their monopoly on the ebook industry. This isn’t the first time […]

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On the Road for non “beatnik groupies”

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Craving to be a ‘50s vagabond like Kerouac’s Sal Paradise but fear traveling without your GPS? On the Road fans worry need not worry! Gregor Weichbrodt has “rewritten” the entire novel solely using Google Maps driving directions. The open-source book is fifty-five pages long and only features 17,527 miles. Weichbrodt says about his work, “If […]

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Survival of The Adjuncts

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We’ve talked about the struggling plight of adjunct teachers in the past, but The New York Times has put out a pained portrait of James D. Hoff, an adjunct English teacher in the CUNY conglomerate and it’s worth a look.  Hoff’s story is one of many seeing that over sixty-percent of CUNY’s instructors are part-time […]

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Retrospective: Nancy vs. Tonya

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This month in The Believer, Sarah Marshall takes a look back at figure skating in the 90’s. Particularly the stifled rivalry between US ice princesses Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan. Marshall’s perspective is not unique but it’s beautifully thorough. She examines the figure skating business like a true heart-broken fan – yearning for Kerrigan’s lost […]

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De origine actibusque aequationis

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So: a train races beneath the city, having been made into a vehicle of war, covered with signatures and symbols, it goes crosstown, downtown, taking with it the story of dystopia and crack cocaine, “armamentation,” and innovation as it travels. This is what myths do: they tell us how things came to be. And all […]

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The 15th Anniversary of McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern

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Getting sentimental about the fifteenth anniversary of McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern? So are we. Check out the commemorative, The Best of McSweeney’s, a collection of the publisher’s best and brightest writing since 1998. Can’t wait? Go here to see an excerpt from Rick Moody. To celebrate their fifteenth anniversary, they are also starting a crowdfunding campaign, […]

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“What if poetry isn’t enough?” – Ntozake Shange

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Ntozake Shange, the poet, author and playwright who is mostly known for her play “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf,” is at it again with, “Lost in Language and Sound: Or How I Found My Way to the Arts,” which had its first reading at Nuyorican Poets Café a couple […]

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