Posts Tagged: Jezebel

Everyday You’re Hustlin’

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If you’re not making enough money, or if you’re stuck in a dead-end job that you’re overqualified for, it’s because you just aren’t hustling hard enough. It most certainly is not because there aren’t enough jobs, or the minimum wage isn’t high enough, or because women aren’t guaranteed equal pay under the law.

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Romance Writers Mean Business

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For Pictorial at Jezebel, Kelly Faircloth explores the public imagination’s view of the romance writer, focusing on the genre’s boom in the 1980s and the modern-day romance writer with her eye on the business of writing.

[The Romance Writers of America’s annual conference] reminded me of something like Mary Kay, or Avon—an empire built on the talents of women hunting a flexible opportunity to bring home some cash doing fulfilling work.
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How to Build a Joan of Arc

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For Pictorial at Jezebel, Kelly Faircloth interviews Helen Castor, the author of Joan of Arc: A History, a book that attempts to recreate the context into which Joan of Arc emerged in history:

What was different about what Joan was saying was that she was saying that God was commanding her not only to convey information to her king, but also to take up arms….

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Big, Ugly Truth

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Conservative pundits have been attacking Emma Sulkowicz, the Columbia student who spent the last year carrying around her mattress in protest of how the university handled the discipline hearing after she was raped, labeling her a liar. Most of these criticisms seem to forget that three other women also filed complaints against her attacker, Paul Nungesser.

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How to Harlequin

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Over at Jezebel, Kelly Faircloth shares a fantastic long form piece on the rise of the Harlequin romance novel, and how the brand became synonymous with a wildly lucrative if critically dismissed genre. From the original formula for woman-centered, alpha-male page turners to Harlequin’s relentless advertising tactics to the question of exactly how much sex sells best, Faircloth presents a sociological study.

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But What About Me?

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There’s a certain heuristic online these days that stems from a somewhat impossible idea that every narrated experience should contain, account for, and address every other one out there. There is no breed of reaction that deadens me more, for example, than, ‘Great, but I wish this had been written from my perspective.’ And social media, generally, feels like the only place where an otherwise reasonable person might hear someone say, ‘Here’s how I feel about something that happened’ and immediately start screaming, ‘BUT WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO SAY ABOUT ME.’

Jia Tolentino writing about Elena Ferrante, feminism, identity politics, and well, everything.

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