Rumpus Original Fiction: Salt

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A flash-fire covered the horizon all around and behind her, and my mother glowed genuine blue. I saw her skeleton, or maybe her white-hot soul. Something flew up and around our heads. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Jessica Valenti

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Jessica Valenti discusses her memoir, Sex Object, how the experiences she touches on in her book shaped her, and how she discovered herself outside of those experiences. ...more

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An Ultimate Illustrated Fantasy Guide of Gilmore Girls Mashups

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HOW AWESOME WOULD THESE MASHUPS BE? Oh well. Maybe next year. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Roxane Gay

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Roxane Gay discusses her new collection, Difficult Women, the problem with whiteness as the default and the need for diverse representation, and life as a workaholic. ...more

Market Researching My Desire

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I noted the weirdness, and then filed it away until a time I might really consider the implications of wanting to bury someone’s stockings. I was lost in metaphor, which meant I was lost in everything. ...more

The Real Fidel

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In a flash nearly 200,000 Cuban refugees understood that we’d lost our homeland and had better get used to life en la Yuma. We packed for six weeks, and we stayed for six decades. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with André Alexis

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André Alexis discusses his latest book The Hidden Keys, puzzles, chance, divinity, and the Toronto literary community. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be. ...more

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Letter to Jim

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Many days I couldn’t see the way forward, but I kept going, the way you had. It was you, after all, who taught me how to stay. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Patrick Ryan

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Patrick Ryan discusses his new collection The Dream Life of Astronauts, the “bad old days,” and the human need to believe that everything will turn out okay in the end (even when we know it won’t). ...more

The Rumpus Review of La La Land

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Fantasy needs reality “because it’s only with the real backdrop that it works at all,” and reality needs fantasy to challenge its façade ...more

Sound & Vision #27: Arthur Fournier

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Allyson McCabe talks with Arthur Fournier, an independent dealer of books, serials, manuscripts, and archives, about how he developed his niche, and how digital access has both enriched and complicated the work of archiving and collecting. ...more

My Voice for Their Drugs

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Anxiety disorients me from inside. My heart moves so erratically I’m afraid it will give out, my breath so staggered I have to remind myself to take in air. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Emily Raboteau

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Emily Raboteau discusses her essay, “Know Your Rights!” from the collection, The Fire This Time, what she loves about motherhood, and why it’s time for White America to get uncomfortable. ...more

On Suffering and Sympathy

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What is the distance between sympathy and action? How do we travel from one to the other? ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Kerry and Tyler Cohen

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Sisters and collaborators Kerry and Tyler Cohen talk about their new book Girl Trouble: An Illustrated Memoir, female friendships, and some of the challenges of writing memoir. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jaimee Wriston Colbert

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Life’s inequities can be cruel, but in the end we are all part of our communities; suffering though we may be, we are not alone. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Wa

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It’s about greed; it’s about taking only the best part of things, the cream off the top, the fat. And this taking of the fat has reached a crisis point in America—a critical mass, if you will. ...more

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The Read Along #6: Christina Nichol

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Christina Nichol, author of Waiting for the Electricity, takes a deep dive into Korean literature and catches up on some classics of anthropology and psychology. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Stacy Szymaszek

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Poet Stacy Szymaszek discusses her most recent collection, Journal of Ugly Sites & Other Journals, the "notebook genre," and claiming a city—ugly sites and all. ...more